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Edit: This coin is a 1904 Indian Head Cent Snow #1. 

Rick Snow says the following about this variety:

S1 1904, 904/904 (e).
Obv. 2: (RH) Moderate repunching on the 904 visible mostly on the right side of the base of the 90 and the right side of the upright and diagonal of the 4.
Rev. B: Olive leaf and shield points well away from denticles. The repunching on the 4 and 9 is very bold. This is a very tough variety with very few known.

1904 Indian Head Cent Re-punched Date (RPD) attribution

Trying to identify this 1904 Indian Head Cent Re-punched Date (RPD)

About a year ago, I bought a Indian Head Cent Roll from a customer. My initial motive behind the purchase was to place them in 2×2 cardboard flips and sell them in the $1.00 bargain bin. Most of these had the appearance to grade Good to Fine, with the majority in the G-4 range. When I got home, I set the roll down by the microscope and pretty much forgot about them for about a month. Then one day when I had some time, I started digging through the roll looking for anything Interesting. I did manage to pull out three decent Indian Re-punched dates. I sent those off to ANACS and they came back confirmed as I thought they would.

Some of these Indians, Man, they had so much crud on them that the only option I had was to try and soak them in boiling water. I Let them sit for 15 minutes and then took a slightly moist paper towel to them. That got about 10-20% of the gunk off and still it wasn’t enough. So I repeated the process but in a different way. I took a sturdy plastic container and lined it with tin foil on the bottom. I placed the coins onto the tin foil at the bottom of the container with the worse side up. I sprinkled a large amount of baking soda on top of all the Indian Cents. With another batch of boiling water, I covered the coins with water about 3 inches deep.

Immediately a cleansing action started, the bubbling was really violent and I noticed a slightly discolored Steam. It stunk, I quickly took the experiment outside on the deck and placed it on the railing and went back inside. I put everything away and returned outside to see how the experiment was coming. After the water had cooled to near lukewarm, I decided to rinse the coins off and paper towel dry them off. About 60% or more of the material came off, and I could see a lot more details on the coins than before.

I looked through all of the Indians, and one of the last ones I looked at, I simply chuckled. Here was a 1904 Indian that looks like it is a Re-punched Date. In the past I have tried to photograph this 1904 Indian Cent but I could NOT get the “04” to show the Re-punched Date.

Tonight I got lucky with the lighting and managed to take these photographs.

The Re-punched Date of the 1904 Indian Cent

The 1904 Indian went from almost unreadable to a better looking Indian Cent. It is not in the best shape, but I was surprised to see how clear the re-punched date stood out. This will be one that I will look for when I am visiting the handful of auction houses I frequent.

1904 Indian Cent Obverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.

1904 Indian Cent Obverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath. 1904 Indian Cent Reverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.

1904 Indian Cent Reverse with a Reunched Date. What the coin looks like after the Baking Soda Bath.

For the “1”, I believe I can see a second portion of the left top portion of the foot of the “1”, I also see a faint line which runs from the base of that foot up to the flag of the “1” .

For the “9”, at the bottom of the “9” and continuing to the outer right hand edge is some relatively bold impression of the lesser punching.

The "19" of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.

The “19” of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.

The “0” seems to be the least affected in the Re-punched date. There is only a slight impression lby the weaker punching to the bottom right hand side. The most impressive digit of the Re-punching is the “4”. The photo shows a second impression from the tail crossbar of the “4” all the way to the top of the “4” . If you look closely at the top of this “4”, something weird is going on. I can clearly see a lower flat top style “4”. The top impression of the “4” at the very top, shows a shorter “4” and the peak is at an angle, probably close to 45 to 60 degrees.

The "04" of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.

The “04” of the 1904 Indian Cent with a Re-punched Date. The Arrows indicate where the re-punching is evident.

Now will come the fun part. I attempted to attribute this coin prior to posting the photos and I have not yet found a match for this Re-punched Indian cent from 1904. I am in no hurry, eventually I will find a match. Edit:  It's a Rare 1904 Indian Head Cent RPD Snow #1 ! :classic_laugh:

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